//The Lazio of the 70s: The New Episode of Jose Eshkenazi Smeke’s Podcast

The Lazio of the 70s: The New Episode of Jose Eshkenazi Smeke’s Podcast

Jose Eshkenazi Smeke Trebel

Jose Eshkenazi Smeke Trebel

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Jose Eshkenazi Smeke Trebel 2

Jose Eshkenazi Smeke Trebel 2

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Jose Eshkenazi Smeke's Podcast comments on Lazio of the 70's in light of current sports and marketing rules.

The story of Lazio in the 70s is worth telling in the face of the polarization experienced this days and the social situation that was reflected in many aspects of life, including soccer”
— Jose Eshkenazi Smeke
MIAMI, FLORIDA, ESTADOS UNIDOS, August 3, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ -- The second episode of the Jose Eshkenazi Smeke Podcast will arrive in the next few days. Below is reproduced part of the interview with Jose Eshkenazi Smeke. The sports marketing expert said that this time the podcast will focus on telling the story of the Lazio of the 70s: the divided champion and if it is possible that this could happen under the current sports and marketing rules.

"The story of Lazio in the 70s is worth telling in the face of the polarization experienced in this days and the social situation that was reflected in many aspects of life, including soccer. The rapid ideological radicalization of the population would lead to the formation of organized groups (both extreme right and extreme left) that would take the conflict to the streets, causing a climate of confusion and insecurity..

In the midst of this discouraging environment that was the bread and butter of the day, a club that had never enjoyed great success in the top flight of Italian soccer burst into the limelight. Quickly and unexpectedly, Lazio, until then accustomed to competing in Serie B, would begin to compete head to head with the biggest teams in Italy despite having one of the most troubled squads of all time.

"With a polarized locker room due to the political sympathies of each player, Lazio's intimacy would become fragmented into two large groups: those on the right and those on the left" Jose Eshkenazi Smeke.

The ideological division of society would reach a dressing room where, like the people in the streets, almost every member of the club a way to protect themselves. Although the two sides had irreconcilable differences, Sunday after Sunday the respective beliefs and points of view of each player would take a back seat to a team that dazzled with its collective unity and good soccer. This peculiar and historic team would be remembered to this day.

One dressing room, two sides.

The then Serie B side would achieve the long-awaited promotion to the top flight in the 71-72 season under the guidance of experienced Italian coach Tommaso Maestrelli. Just one year later, the team would demonstrate its undeniable quality by fighting for the first division championship, finishing the tournament with an honorable and unexpected third place in the final standings. For the nascent season, defender Luigi Martini joined the team from Livorno. Martini, who openly declared himself an extreme conservative sympathizer, would quickly find himself at odds with the team's main leaders; Pino Wilson and Giorgio Chinaglia. Both veterans and team leaders were of English origin and their ideology was aligned with the liberal side, which made the Lazio locker room the perfect breeding ground for conflict.

Over time, the frequent friction between Martinelli and Chinaglia would escalate and eventually split the team into two factions. The ideological disagreement came to a head when almost all the members of the team began to bring tools to protect themselves into the club's facilities. The tension experienced in the locker room would also be transferred to the training sessions, which would become duels to the death where everyone fought for every ball as if it were an official match. For safety reasons and on the orders of the coach himself, who was aware of the situation, the club would have to adapt a second dressing room so that the two sides would not meet. Although a climate of hostility reigned in the atmosphere, when Sunday arrived, both groups forgot their differences and behaved as a true team, demonstrating an important solidarity and brotherhood on the courts.

This was a far cry from what was experienced on a day-to-day basis, where tension was present at all times.

The strong internal competition added to the collective functioning of the club would bring historic results for the entity that was not used to the big stages. After a spectacular campaign, Lazio won the first division championship for the first time in the 73-74 season. Although the sporting successes would be remembered, the spectacular team would go down in the history books for its peculiar behavior off the field.

"Sadly, the beginning of the end for Lazio would come in the summer of 1977 when the team captain opted to leave. Giorgio Chinaglia would make the decision to leave the club, packing his bags for the New York Cosmos. One of the two warring factions was without its top leader," recalls sports marketing specialist Jose Eshkenazi Smeke.

Just a few months later, the almost fatal blow to the team came with the unexpected death of the coach and sole mediator in the conflict, Tommaso Maestrelli, who died of liver cancer. The team would not be able to recover from the loss, falling to the bottom of the standings at the beginning of 1978. The club's recent successes were a long way off.

Why is this case important in light of the polarization in the world? Well, that's exactly what the podcast is going to be about. I invite you to listen to it," the businessman finally commented.

What is Jose Eshkenazi Smeke's Podcast?

It is a space to comment on relevant current and historical events that have an impact on the development of sports marketing. Jose Eshkenazi Smeke is one of the leaders in sports marketing and virtual advertising in the region.

Mia Atkinson
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